March Pre-K Literature

 

The Wind Blew

Intro to book (predicting)
Before opening the book, name the title and author. Ask the children: What do they see in the picture? Without showing them the inside of the book, ask what they think it is going to be about. Use the child’s initials to show who said what to record predictions. What do they think will happen to the items being blown? Turn through the pages, without reading them. See if the children have any new predictions.

OR:
Ask the children if they have ever been in a windstorm. What kind of things did they see blowing? What season do they think it is? What does the clothing and items in the sky tell you about what season it is? After telling the name of the book and author, turn to the dedication page. Who do they think Mark is? What are those green things?

OR:
Look at the picture on the cover before telling the name of the book and author. Have each child tell you one color that they see. Then ask the questions like: How old do you think the children are? What do you think they are doing? Where do you think the items above the people came from? How many people are there? How many items in the sky? Do they think the items belong to the people? Which one do they think belongs with which person? Before opening the book tell the kids the title and author. Does that information change their answers?

Warm-blooded Animals (science)
In January we talked about how woodland animals can survive during a cold winter. Explain that many of these animals are warm-blooded. That means that their bodies stay the same temperature no matter how cold the air is outside. Discuss ways animals might keep warm. (Birds grow heavy, oily feathers; bears, foxes and rabbits grow thick fur; woodchucks and chipmunks hibernate. Most animals find warm places to say.) People and other animals are cold blooded. That means our body temperature adjust along with the outside temperature. What do we do to stay warm?

Observation
Reread the book and have the children describe what is happening in each picture. Ask the children to pay particular attention to the way each person looks. Encourage details: The man has a rain coat and boots on, he is partially bald, has a mustache, and wears glasses. The girl has brown hair, a green skirt and red sweater on. How can they tell it is windy?

Picture Detail
Reread the book, inviting the children to look for clues in each picture that show that it is windy. Ask if any clues are given about the next person who will lose something. Help children figure out that the person who is going to lose something next always appears on the preceding page. Look at the next to last page. What is funny about this picture?

Who Would You Choose to be? (feelings)
After rereading the story, ask the children who they would like to be in the story? Why? Make a graph.

Wind Strength
Wind can have different strengths. Can the children remember a day when there was a light breeze? What were they doing? What did that feel like? Ask about days when it was very windy? What were they doing? What did it feel like? Is the wind different in the winter than in the summer? Reread the book pointing out the descriptive words that describe what the wind did (took the umbrella, snatched the balloon, etc.) How strong do they think the wind was to do that?

Follow-up:
After saying the descriptive word, decide how they think the wind sounded. What did it sound like when it took something, when it whirled something, etc. Reread the book, having the children make the noise of the wind after reading the descriptive word (pause after the descriptive word, allowing them to make the wind sound). You could also do this on another day, using scarves. The children could move their scarves according to how forceful they think the wind would be.

Making Your Own Wind Story
Have the children draw their own wind story. What items would they have blowing? Where would the items end up?

My favorite part is (recall)
Read through the story together. Have each child open their book to their favorite page. Have them tell you why it is their favorite. Toward the middle of the month you can have them tell you what it says on that page.

Drawing (imagination/dictation)
Have the children draw a picture of their favorite part of the book. Have them tell you about it and write their dictation on the bottom of the page.

Dramatization
Have children pretend to be an item from the story. They can blow around the room and return to their place. Or you could set-up an obstacle course for them to blow through.

Real/Pretend
Do the children think the story could be real or is it pretend? Could the wind really take an umbrella out of your hand and turn it inside out? Could it snatch a balloon, etc? Why/why not?

Predicting (language/science)
Talk to the children about the items blown in the story. Get Sharon’s box out and a fan (bring an electric fan, if available). Have the children pick an item out of the box. Do they predict it will blow in the wind from the fan or not? Write the child’s name and the object they chose on a graph. Draw a smiley face after it, if the item blew and sad face if it did not.

My favorite part is (recall)
Read through the story together. Have each child open their book to their favorite page. Have them tell you why it is their favorite. Toward the middle of the month you can have them tell you what it says on that page.

What do you think? (classifying/feelings)
Read book together. Ask would you like to be the man with the umbrella? Why? Would they like to be the girl with the balloon? Why? Do they like the ending? Do they like the pictures? What different kind of ending could they think of?

Alphabet Soup (letter recognition)
Teacher spread out I-T foam letters in the middle of the circle. Tell them it’s soup…alphabet soup. Draw a letter on butcher paper, naming it, and ask the child to find that letter in the soup.